Pressurized CO2

Cryptocoryne Cordata Var. Siamensis ‘Rosanervig’ Submersed

Cryptocoryne Cordata Var. Siamensis ‘Rosanervig’ is a very rare yet controversial plant due to it’s white/pink veining that no one has been able to put a thumb on. We do know that the veining is due to a virus, however the veining seems to either be very pronounced or not pronounced at all depending upon the set up they are in.

I have seen this species under high light conditions (60+ PAR) with it’s veining still present and very deep, while also seeing this species in another set up with med/high light where hardly any veining is pronounced.

For me personally I have only been able to get deep/rich white/pink veining to display under lower light conditions like you’ll see with this runner hidden behind a piece of driftwood…

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HOWEVER; I also have a runner in the front of my tank where the light is MUCH brighter (60+ PAR) and you can clearly see a pronounced pink/white vein, although it is not as “thick” as the one hidden behind the driftwood.
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This is a new leaf forming off the mother plant, the mother unfortunately does not have the greatest veining but the plant is an absolute monster at almost 18+ inches tall and constantly sending 10-15 runners every 6-8 months.
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Here are more runners, in total I have six runners currently popping up, all ranging in size from tiny plants just forming to daughters that have 2-3 leaves.

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As always here are the specs the plant is kept in:

PH- 7.4 at night, 6.5 during the day when CO2 is on.
Temperature- 74-76
Lighting- 30″ Dual bulb T5HO – 6700k and Rosette bulb (10 hours per day). 24″ Dual bulb T5HO – 6700k and Rosette bulb (8 hours per day)
Filtration- Marineland C220 Canister Filter
Substrate- Flourite Dark, Flourite Red, Flourite Black Sand, Muriate of Potash, Dolomite, Mineralized Top Soil, and Natural red clay from the earth.
Water Changes- X 1 a week 50%
Dosing- Alternate Micro and Macro ( 1 day Micro, 1 Day Macro, etc) KNO3, KH2PO4, KS2O4, and Plantex CSM+B.
CO2 – Dual Stage Concoa 212 with Parker H3l, Fabco Solenoid, bubble counter and 15LB CO2 Tank. 2 BPS via inline diffuser on canister outlet line.

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How To Build A Pressurized CO2 Set Up For A Planted Tank

Below I’m going to outline how to build a suitable dual stage CO2 regulator for a planted aquarium; I do not recommend using single stage regulators due to the fact that they do not keep a constant pressure like dual stage regulators do, nor do they react as fact to changes in PSI when wanting to make adjustments. Dual stage regulators will save not only your fish, but your time, money and stress when having to adjust your single stage regulator. Common single stage regulator brands include but are not limited to : Milwaukee MA 957, Red Sea CO2 Regulators (Including Pro Model), Aquatic Life Co2 Regulators, Azoo CO2 Regulator, and DC CO2 Regulators. Keep in mind there are MANY other single stage CO2 regulators, especially those coming out of China/Japan which I highly recommend to STAY AWAY from.

Here is a list of amazing dual stage regulators, keep in mind these brands also make single stage regulators so you must do your research when figuring out which model number will be suitable for our purposes:

– Matheson
– Concoa
– Praxair
– Prostar
– Harris
– Linde
– Air Gas
– AGA
– Victor

Here is a regulator I use on one of my planted tanks, I’m a big fan of Concoa regulators and the 212 and 312 models are amazing for our purposes with a planted tank.

Here are a few shots of my set up, some are pictures from home and others are from a speech I recently did.

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One way to always tell if your regulator is dual stage without having to look up the model number is by looking at the back of the regulator; below is an example of a dual stage regulator and a single stage regulator, both in which I own.
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The next important thing for your CO2 set up is your Solenoid Valve and Needle Valve, also knowing as a Metering Valve. I prefer to use a Fabco Solenoid with a Parker H3L although there are endless options when it comes to this step; Parker H3L’s are superior metering valves making them very hard to come by, and when they do it is not at a cheap price.

– Fabco Directional Control Valve, Part # 3853-04-A287 – $27
– Plug Sys 8 Mini, Part # 4552150 $3

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Parker 2F-H3L-V-SS-TC with 1/8 NPT (Female)
Pricing – $50-$800 (All depends who you know 😉 )

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The second last optional set is your bubble counter; this is more so something just to give you a visual representation of how much CO2 is going past the metering valve but is completely unnecessary once you understand the relationship between CO2 PSI, Regulator Flow, and Metering Valves.

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The only other thing you need after the bubble counter is some CO2 resistant tubing, or the stuff from Home Depot or Lowes works perfectly fine; and a CO2 diffuser.

How you choose to diffuse your CO2 is up to you and entirely depends on the equipment you’re using for filtration and the size of your aquarium. With that said, CO2 diffusion is a whole other topic in itself which I will write about another time in a more detailed manner.

If anyone has any questions feel free to e-mail me or comment and I’ll help you out as much as I can.

Microsorum Pteropus ‘Windelov’ AKA Windelov Java Jern

Microsorum Pteropus ‘Windelov’ AKA Windelov Java Jern is an awesome plant for any planted tank when using driftwood, under high light this plant will stay nice and compact however under lower light it will grow long and “leggy” making it quite unattractive in my opinion.

With that said, Windelov Java Fern is best used in higher light aquariums, and will do best with CO2 supplementation although it is not needed. Windelov Java Fern does best when attached to a piece of driftwood or rock however it can also be planted in the substrate provided the rhizome has not been planted.

The number one rule for any plant with a rhizome is to never plant the rhizome as it will rot once buried in the substrate; you only want to plant the actual roots.

A secret for Java Fern species is “the more you cut it, the more it will grow” as commonly said by the godfather Takashi Amano.

Enjoy the pictures below, and as always here are the specs:

PH- 7.4 at night, 6.5 during the day when CO2 is on.
Temperature- 74-76
Lighting- 30″ Dual bulb T5HO – 6700k and Rosette bulb (7 hours per day). 24″ Dual bulb T5HO – 6700k and Rosette bulb (2 hours per day during the middle of the 7 hour lighting period)
Filtration- Marineland C220 Canister Filter
Substrate- Flourite Dark, Flourite Red, Flourite Black Sand, Muriate of Potash, Dolomite, Mineralized Top Soil, and Natural red clay from the earth.
Water Changes- X 1 a week 50%
Dosing- Alternate Micro and Macro ( 1 day Micro, 1 Day Macro, etc)

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Pogostemon Helferi ‘Downoi’

Pogostemon Helferi also known as ‘Downoi’ is one of my favourite foreground plants; it can be difficult to grow for some people but that’s normally due to insufficient nutrients, CO2, and lighting.

In my experience I’ve found this species to really prefer the higher like (60+ PAR), a nutrient rich substrate, adequate CO2 supplementation and an acidic environment.

Once established Downoi will spread quickly via growing smaller plants off the base stem; most people think Downoi is a rooted plant when it is actually a stem plant as it has a crown.

Here are some pictures from my 37 gallon aquarium, as well as the specs for anyone interested :

PH- 7.4 at night, 6.5 during the day when CO2 is on.
Temperature- 74-76
Lighting- 30″ Dual bulb T5HO – 6700k and Rosette bulb (7 hours per day). 24″ Dual bulb T5HO – 6700k and Rosette bulb (2 hours per day during the middle of the 7 hour lighting period)
Filtration- Marineland C220 Canister Filter
Substrate- Flourite Dark, Flourite Red, Flourite Black Sand, Muriate of Potash, Dolomite, Mineralized Top Soil, and Natural red clay from the earth.
Water Changes- X 1 a week 50%
Dosing- Alternate Micro and Macro ( 1 day Micro, 1 Day Macro, etc)

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Ammania Sp. Bonsai AKA True Rotala Indica – Tropica 1-2 Grow UPDATE 4 (Germinated Seeds)

Ammania Sp. Bonsai AKA True Rotala Indica is a fairly easy plant to grow once it’s been established, provided you’re growing it under optimal conditions. I’ve had this plant constantly flowering for quite some time now which has given me the opportunity to experiment with it’s flower and seeds; however I have not figured out how to germinate the seed on it’s own without being attached to the plant.

When I see ripe pink open flowers I take a small paintbrush and collect pollen from one plant and place it on another open flower in an attempt to artificially pollinate the plant; this has worked successfully for me so far in the past four months.

A few weeks later the plant flower will close, followed by the flower turning itself into a seed which then feeds off the mother plant growing tiny baby stem plants with surprisingly extensive root systems. As you’ll see below it there are easily 15-20 tiny stems in each seed but they are EXTREMELY difficult to even plant, for reference the pictures below were taken on my fingertip.

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Here shows the life stage of the flower from a tiny flower bud, to open buds, to the seedling now growing off the mother:
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At the last stage of it’s lifespan the Ammania Sp. Bonsai will begin to rot away after it’s produced a bunch of daughters as you see in the photo above.

As always here are the specs in which the plant is kept in:

Lighting – 4 T5 36″ SHOPLIGHTS (Nothing Fancy!!) The lights don’t even have reflector’s on them.
Light Bulbs – X 2 6700 Natural Daylight, X 2 Rosette ColourMax Bulbs.
Lighting Duration – Lights on at 10:00am, Lights off at 10:00pm = Full 12 hours, I gradually drop this down to 8 when the winter comes.
Substrate – 1 Cow Manure, 1 Sheep Manure, 1 Worm Castings, 3 CHEAP topsoil, 2 Peat, 0.5 Naturally Collected Clay
Humidity – Misting done via MistKing pump for 20 seconds at 1:30pm and at 6:30pm. Humidity stays between 70-80%
Temperature – 68-70 when lights are off and it is night time, 72-74 when all the lights are on in the plant room.
PH – 6.5 with the use of Almond leaves; being sure to keep on top of replacing them not letting the PH swing too much.

I also keep this plant in a submersed state in my main display tank, I try to not let the stems get too tall as I prefer to use it in a Bonsai effect. Once established in your aquarium Ammania Sp. Bonsai is really not all that difficult to grow, just be sure to have sufficient lighting, nutrient rich substrate, and pressurized CO2 supplementation.

Here are some pictures of the plant submersed in my tank.

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Cryptocoryne X Purpurea Ridley Nothovar. Purpurea ‘Kota Tingga’

This is by far probably the rarest Cryptocoryne I own, especially considering they have completely destroyed it’s natural habitat due to palm oil plantations being put up.  I really hope I can grow this one and propagate it so it can be spread to fellow hobbyists; here is a link for further information and pictures of the plant :

http://images.aquaria.net/plants/Cryptocoryne/p/PUR/PUR/Kota_Tingga/
http://crypts.home.xs4all.nl/Cryptocoryne/Gallery/pur/pur.html

Since I literally just got this plant it still needs to adjust to it’s new conditions, I’ll be keeping it in my emersed tank like many other Cryptocoryne’s I own.

Lighting- Coralife T5NO Dual Bulb – 6700k and rosette bulb – Lights are on for 10 hours. 
PH- 7.5
Substrate- Homemade substrate mix, cow manure, sheep manure, worm castings, natural red clay, and cheap topsoil.

 

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Cryptocoryne Cordata Var. Siamensis ‘Thailand Sungai Kolok CTSK’

There is little to no information on this Cryptocoryne anywhere on the internet; I can only trace it back to two people, one in which I know personally and is a great friend of mine; where the other one who originally brought this plant in hasn’t said much about it (at least from what I could find).

I just recently got this species on the weekend so it is still adapting to it’s new conditions and is quite small; however as it grows I will take lots of pictures.

Also, here is a link to my friend who posted a picture of the spathe when he had it blooming: Photo belongs to orchidnutz;Jim. R

http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/attachment.php?attachmentid=29186&d=1411536600

Right now I have it under the following conditions:

Lighting- Coralife T5NO Dual Bulb – 6700k and rosette bulb – Lights are on for 10 hours. 
PH- 7.5
Substrate- Homemade substrate mix, cow manure, sheep manure, worm castings, natural red clay, and cheap topsoil.

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Cryptocoryne Cordata Var. Siamensis ‘Blassii’

Cryptocoryne Cordata Var. Siamensis ‘Blassii’ is another plant that gave me trouble submersed, however in emersed conditions this plant grows extremely well and sends many daughter plants.

This is a great beginner Cryptocoryne that you don’t always see for sale; I originally got this species from Oriental Aquarium in Singapore.

Lighting- Coralife T5NO Dual Bulb – 6700k and rosette bulb – Lights are on for 10 hours. 
PH- 7.5
Substrate- Homemade substrate mix, cow manure, sheep manure, worm castings, natural red clay, and cheap topsoil.

In some pictures you can see the pink “shine” the plant has, it’s quite attractive.

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Cryptocoryne Nurii ‘Pahang Mutated’ or ‘Pahang’ ???

I first purchased a confirmed Cryptocoryne Nurii ‘Pahang Mutated’ from a great friend of mine who is also a fellow Cryptocoryne collector; upon receiving the plant I was a complete amateur at the time to planted tanks and ended up killing the plant due to an ice storm we had during the Christmas of 2013. The plant ended up dying due to the fact that I had to move during this ice storm and I thought the plant would be okay in a bucket of water while we moved, little to know I didn’t realize how sensitive this plant was to temperature change and it did not make the 2.5 hour ride from my apartment to my parents house.

Here are some pictures of the plant before I killed it 😦 I’ve outlined the older and newer leaves as the older leaves were from my friend grown in his conditions and the newer leaves were grown in my conditions. You can clearly see the beautiful infamous ‘Tiger Stripes’ that we all long for.

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A few months later I ended up receiving what I was told to be a Cryptocoryne Nurii ‘Pahang’ from a plant trade with a friend, but as this plant has grown out and sent runners/daughter plants, I now believe this plant may be Cryptocoryne Nurii ‘Pahang Mutated’ as the person I traded with also had this plant among his collection.

Although the veining is not as pronounced as what I’ve seen with the previous Cryptocoryne Nurii ‘Pahang Mutated’ that I owned, the veins in this one are still present as is the faint pink veins similar to a Cordata Rosanervig.

If anyone could please comment and let me know their overall opinion on what they think the plant is in terms of Nurii ‘Pahang’ or Nurii ‘Pahang Mutated’ I would greatly appreciate it.

As always here are the conditions in which I am keeping it now plus pictures; I apologize in advance for bad photos, the plant is located in the back corner of my aquarium making it difficult to photograph.

PH- 7.4 at night, 6.5 during the day when CO2 is on.
Temperature- 74-76
Lighting- 30″ Dual bulb T5HO – 6700k and Rosette bulb (7 hours per day). 24″ Dual bulb T5HO – 6700k and Rosette bulb (2 hours per day during the middle of the 7 hour lighting period)
Filtration- Marineland C220 Canister Filter
Substrate- Flourite Dark, Flourite Red, Flourite Black Sand, Muriate of Potash, Dolomite, Mineralized Top Soil, and Natural red clay from the earth.
Water Changes- X 1 a week
Dosing- Alternate Micro and Macro ( 1 day Micro, 1 Day Macro, etc)

Nurii Pahang or Pahang Mutated 3
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Cryptocoryne Wendtii ‘Tropica’

Cryptocoryne Wendtii ‘Tropica’ is a fairly common and easy plant to grow, especially if given the right conditions. I originally purchased this plant about a year ago when I first started collecting aquatic plants and was amazed at how gorgeous the veining is on the plant for such a common Cryptocoryne.

Cryptocoryne Wendtii ‘Tropica’ will display it’s veins under higher light (60+ PAR) and a very nutrient rich substrate; I like to keep all my plants in an extremely nutrient rich substrate in order to cut back on manual liquid dosing/fertilization.

For any beginner aquatic plant enthusiasts this is a perfect plant for those looking to add a bit of ‘flare’ to their aquarium without having to purchase an expensive plant.

As I’ve mentioned in my previous posts I’ll continue to also add the conditions in which the plant is kept; like the previous two plants (E. Tenellus and C. Tonkinensis) this one is also in my 37 gallon high tech aquarium so the conditions are the same:

PH- 7.4 at night, 6.5 during the day when CO2 is on.
Temperature- 74-76
Lighting- 30″ Dual bulb T5HO – 6700k and Rosette bulb (7 hours per day). 24″ Dual bulb T5HO – 6700k and Rosette bulb (2 hours per day during the middle of the 7 hour lighting period)
Filtration- Marineland C220 Canister Filter
Substrate- Flourite Dark, Flourite Red, Flourite Black Sand, Muriate of Potash, Dolomite, Mineralized Top Soil, and Natural red clay from the earth.
Water Changes- X 1 a week
Dosing- Alternate Micro and Macro ( 1 day Micro, 1 Day Macro, etc)

Wendtii Tropica Wendtii Tropica 2 Wendtii Tropica 3 Wendtii Tropica 4